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David A. Goldhamer, UC Davis Cooperative Extension Water Management Specialist, Quote

September 28th, 2010

“The Wright Brothers’ first airplane flight was in 1903. In 1969, astronauts landed on the moon,” he said. “In just 66 years – six and a half decades – science advanced that much. It gives me motivation to do my work.”
– UC Davis Cooperative Extension water management specialist David A. Goldhamer

What’s wrong with Hard Water?

September 20th, 2010

QUESTION: What’s wrong with Hard Water?

According to the Better Business Bureau publication, “Tips on Water Quality Improvement”, hard water in the home:

1.Will increase your soap and cleaning supply cost by 50%.

2.Requires additional time in cleaning your home.

3.Dries your skin.

4.Causes spotting on fixtures, glasses, dishes and silverware.

5.Increases the cost to heat your water by 22% if heating with electricity and 27% if heating with natural gas.

6.Makes washable clothing wear out faster.

7.Will drastically shorten the life of all your water using appliances.


THE SOLUTION?

Magnation’s H2O ENERGIZER HOME SYSTEM.

With easy installation to a home’s main line, the Residential System improves the ability of water to dissolve waste and other compounds.

Plus, this highly efficient water helps reduce water and energy costs, plumbing expenses, and chemical use.

Guaranteed Benefits

BATHROOM

  • Produces less scaling in pipes & shower heads
  • Less residue on shower screens, floor & walls
  • Reduces need for shampoo, soaps & cleaners

KITCHEN

  • Water efficiency for cooking & cleaning
  • Improves taste of the food and beverages
  • Softens entire water system without chemicals

LAUNDRY

  • Cuts detergent use in half by increasing dissolvability
  • Reduces discharge of chemicals into the environment

GARDEN

  • Reduces irrigation costs
  • Enhances the benefits for lawns, vegetable gardens, flower beds, and all plants and trees
  • Cuts the need for fertilizers

California Farmer Reports 30% Savings in Water Use

September 8th, 2010

Mark Merritt of Merritt E.W. Farms in Porterville, California confirmed today he saved 30% in water use this past season on 340 acres of vines using Magnation’s water systems. Here’s a breakdown of the ROI based on this first test site where he implemented the H2O ENERGIZER:

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Water Problems in China

August 31st, 2010

Environmental Degradation

Water pollution and water shortages pose the most serious problems. They cause health ailments, damage agriculture, jam up hydroelectric dams, interfere with manufacturing and limit urbanization. As aquifers dry up, soil erodes, turning an area the size of Connecticut to desert every year. The resulting dust storms add to the country’s already horrendous air pollution. Beijing’s preferred solution to the problem is a massive south-to-north river diversion project. Odds are, that will make matters worse, draining water from already overtaxed southern supplies.

MRI’s are familiar and trusted, right?

August 25th, 2010

Did you know that MRI stands for MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING? This technology–which is used intensively in all sorts of medical diagnostics–is the standard in medicine today.

One can’t skimp when it comes to identifying a torn ligament– a very small detail on an MRI image that is made possible by magnets. And this type of detail rests on the intensity of the magnets inside the MRI machinery.  MRI’s use a powerful magnetic field to align the nuclear magnetization of (usually) hydrogen atoms in water in the body. Radio frequency (RF) fields are used to systematically alter the alignment of this magnetization. This causes the hydrogen nuclei to produce a rotating magnetic field detectable by the scanner. This signal can be manipulated by additional magnetic fields to build up enough information to construct an image of the body.

In a nutshell, MRI’s use the same element as Omni’s Water Systems in its’ technology: MAGNETS.

Omni’s proprietary technology – HDMR – HYDRODYNAMIC MAGNETIC RESONANCE – has also been proven and is successfully used in agricultural fields around the world today.

Water: A Human Right Or A Commodity?

August 23rd, 2010

The fundamental question is whether water is a fundamental human right, or a commodity; a privileged service that you can only access if you can afford it.

Article 25 of the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights—the premier human rights doctrine that practically all nations have signed up to—notes the following:

“Everyone has the right to a standard of living adequate for the health and well-being of himself and of his family, including food, clothing, housing and medical care and necessary social services, and the right to security in the event of … circumstances beyond his control.”

— Universal Declaration of Human Rights, United Nations, December 10, 1948

While water is not mentioned explicitly, the right to food includes water as well, because water is essential for humans to live, and is therefore in line with the principles of the declaration.

We’re on Twitter!

August 20th, 2010

If you’re into Twitter, come check us out for latest info on events, information, etc.

http://www.twitter.com/MagnationWater

Linked up at LinkedIn

August 12th, 2010

Become a part of our network at LinkedIn!

http://www.linkedin.com/companies/1153925
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Going Social on Facebook!

August 11th, 2010

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We’re in the beginnings of getting our social media act together. Stay informed and up to date with trade shows, promos, press, and informative tidbits via Facebook.

Please visit our new Community Fan Page:
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Omni-Enviro-Water-Systems/144353578927983

Also coming up soon: Twitter, YouTube, e-Newsletters and RSS feed capabilities.

Wisdom of the Last Farmer

June 30th, 2010
By David Mas Masumoto

By David Mas Masumoto

A new find… perhaps something worth reading?

An excerpt from the Forward, which pulled me in immediately, goes like this…

“I first heard of Mas in 1994, when I was in the kitchen at Chez Panisse and a dessert leaving the pastry station caught my eye. Actually I more or less gasped in disbelief, and that’s not because the dessert was so beautiful or ornate (it was) or because I hadn’t seen a dessert like it before (I hadn’t). I gasped because it was so crazy. It was a single peach on a dessert plate, no sprig of mint, no swish of raspberry sauce. It was Peach, unadorned.”

…”It was the best peach of my life; but I have to qualify that because like most Americans born in the last fifty years, I didn’t know what a peach should taste like. Breeders in the ’70s and ’80s created low-acid, high-sugar peaches that can be picked when they’re still hard, making them suitable for withstanding the rigors of cross-country travel. So we got drunk on sugar, and created taste memories that are more Mrs. Butterworth than Mother Nature. We fell for the wrong woman, and we’re still paying for it.

But my greatest memory from that night is the reaction those peaches got from older diners. Waiters reported several tables saying the same thing: “I hadn’t had a peach like that since I was a child!” The diners tore apart the peaches with their hands, talking happily about summer afternoons in their grandmother’s backyard, lazy mornings in the hammock, the smell of a late August evening.

They were incredible peaches, no doubt. But more than that—as if a peach needs to be more than that—they did that night what I suspect Mas is most thrilled about.

They got people to consider the connection between good food, which is of course food grown in the right way and picked at the most perfect moment, and the memorable moments of life.”

– Dan Barber, Executive Chef and co-owner of Blue Hill Farm

The Wisdom of the Last Farmer
By: David Mas Masumoto