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Archive for the ‘Farmers’ Category

Boost Poultry Vitality and Disease Resistance against Avian Flu

Friday, December 19th, 2014
Avian Flu Will Have Notable Impact on Poultry Trade: Report 

Rabobank’s Food & Agribusiness Research and Advisory group says avian flu virus pressure will become a global issue for the ag industry after new high-pathogenic avian flu outbreaks in the European Union, Canada, India and Egypt add to existing cases in East Asia and Mexico.Rabobank analyst Nan-Dirk Mulder says the disease is increasingly spreading globally via wild birds.

Affected regions will therefore continue to suffer from economic damage and temporary lost export markets, with lower local prices especially for dark meat, Rabobank says. The bank’s report comes just as USDA this week announced a pathogenic bird flu strain had been identified in wild birds in Washington state.

Magnation’s maintenance-free water treatment boosts vitality and disease resistance in poultry, livestock and all living things from plants to people. Improve cellular metabolism, hydration, digestion and more. One time installation with 10-20 years of healthier water. Requires zero energy. Learn more 

#IPPE, #International Poultry Processing Expo, #Poultry Health

 

Better Water for Feeding 9 Billion

Wednesday, October 22nd, 2014

According to National Geographic, Farming is the thirstiest user of our precious water supplies and a major polluter, as runoff from fertilizers and manure disrupts fragile lakes, rivers, and coastal ecosystems across the globe. We’ll likely have two billion more mouths to feed by mid-century—more than nine billion people. But sheer population growth isn’t the only reason we’ll need more food. The spread of prosperity across the world, especially in China and India, is driving an increased demand for meat, eggs, and dairy, boosting pressure to grow more corn and soybeans to feed more cattle, pigs, and chickens. If these trends continue, the double whammy of population growth and richer diets will require us to roughly double the amount of crops we grow by 2050. 5 suggestions from the writers of “Feeding The World” article:

  1. Step One: Freeze Agriculture’s Footprint
  2. Step Two: Grow More on Farms We’ve Got
  3. Step Three: Use Resources More Efficiently
  4. Step Four: Shift Diets
  5. Step Five: Reduce Waste

Magnation Water Technologies can help with:

  • Step One: Reducing Agriculture’s Footprint by using less pesticides, fertilizers, herbicides and insecticides, along with 10% less energy to pump water. This means less pollution not only by reducing inputs, but also by softer water entering the soil reducing surface runoff significantly.
  • Step Two: Grow More on Farms ~ with healthier water, improved soil conditions, and more vigorous plants, crop yield not only increases, but crop quality does too. And Livestock benefits include healthier animals with improved hydration and nutrient absorption, and improved disease resistance.
  • Step Three: Use Resources More Efficiently ~ every type of farming operation can benefit from using 20-30% less water, 10% less inputs, 10% less energy to move the water. Not to mention longer-lasting equipment and less maintenance due to less scale buildup. All with no added chemicals, energy, or maintenance.

San Joaquin Valley Farmer

Wednesday, October 15th, 2014

A Southern San Joaquin Valley orchardist was experiencing health issues. One of Magnation’s sales reps invited him to try our chemical-free water treatment unit on his house. If it helped the well water for the home, he might consider larger units for his orchards. Not only did it improve his landscaping and make the use of water in the home more economic, his health problems cleared up as well.

He then ordered an 8” Magnation unit for one of his deep wells.  His farm manager said if he had known about the purchase, he would have discouraged it.

Some months later, the farm manager stated, “I haven’t seen such great results on my trees in 15 years!” He said they used to load up with gypsum and other chemicals to keep things in balance. Magnation’s Rainbolt unit changed all that.

They bought two more 8” units for the other wells. Given the drought and falling water tables, anything that cuts water usage by 20% while saving chemicals, lowers pumping energy load, improves crop output and quality needs to be realized.

More real people just like you have their stories to share.

#Drought, #SaveWater, #Healthier Crops, #HardWater

 

 

Biochemical Sequence of Nutrition in Plants

Monday, August 11th, 2014

Biochemical Sequence of Nutrition in Plants is a great article which bring attention to how agriculture can be oversimplified.  And when it is oversimplified, actions intended to benefit plant growth, like adding NPK fertilizer, can actually hinder the process.   While it can be helpful to simplify complex problems, solutions that only address a portion of the issue or process are not sustainable.  In this article, the author identified at least 8 elements that are important for comprehensive plant health, but many fertilizers only focus on 3: nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium.  The author’s more holistic approach to agriculture is more sustainable and effective in the long run.

Everything starts with better soils.

Saturday, October 20th, 2012

AJ Ochoa of Othello, Washington, farms potatoes on higher ph soils, irrigating through deep wells and also a local aquifer.

“The main word that I could come away with was ‘mellower soils’ which is one of the most important fundamentals in farming. Everything starts with better soils.” says AJ. “We drove into the fields that were treated and fields that were not treated after harvest. The ride in the truck was much smoother in the fields that were treated. The truck ride in the untreated field was very hard and bumpy. As for the harvest of potatoes there is much less dirt that sticks to the potatoes when treated due to mellower soils.”

AJ also has 2″ units installed in his potato coolers which show a more consistent and uniform mist for storing potatoes and will show reduction in scale build up . He’s very satisfied and convinced that he can see more of the benefits in the second year than the first.

CLICK HERE TO WATCH VIDEO of AJ OCHOA POTATO HARVEST 2012
Aj Ochoa Potato Harvest 2012
Video taken in this week’s visit with in Othello, WA. Mr. Ochoa has been using our systems for 2 years.

Fall 2012 Drought Update for Farming & Energy Industries

Saturday, October 13th, 2012

Drastically reduced rainfall and triple-digit temperatures throughout much of the nation have damaged corn and other crops, which will have significant impacts on supplies and prices for animal feed, livestock, meat and dairy products, and processed grain products, including ethanol. The drought has also disrupted the transportation of some commodities, such as petroleum and coal, that are delivered by barges on the Mississippi River. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has reported groundings of traffic along the Mississippi River due to low water depths, and NOAA has stated that portions of the Mississippi River south of Memphis are below the 1988 low-water level. Droughts can also create reliability concerns for electric power plants. Increased temperatures drive demand for electricity to cool homes and businesses, but lower water levels can affect the operation of many thermoelectric power plants.

The U.S. Drought Monitor, a joint publication of USDA and NOAA, is currently reporting that large areas of the Midwest and Great Plains regions are experiencing significant drought conditions. NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center (CPC), integrating Drought Monitor data with weather forecasting, is predicting that the drought conditions will remain mostly unchanged through the end of November.

Published by Independent Statistics & Analysis US Energy Information Administration

10-30% More Bushels of Corn per Acre

Tuesday, September 27th, 2011

One of our farmers in drought-ridden Copeland, Kansas who farms 480 acres of corn has reported an average increase of 40-50 bushels per acre from his recent harvest.

The field is irrigated via pivot. Our system was installed at the 4th tower, meaning that the outer circle in the field was treated. You can see the comparison in the attached arial shot. The interior circle did not get treated.

We have been keeping track of the vegetation pattern via satellite. The images captured are from July 30th and August 15. The increase of water penetration shows by more green and less yellow on the imagery.

We will be coming to Kansas end of October for a presentation with the farmer. Please call us if you are interested in attending. We would love to visit with you!

 

480 acres Copeland, Kansas with H2O Energizer water system installed

California Roundtable on Water and Food Supply Recommendations

Tuesday, July 12th, 2011
Agriculture Water Stewardship

Agriculture Water Stewardship


“Moving water is the most complex and artful thing we do as farmers.”
–Danny Merkley


Synopsis

California Roundtable on Water and Food Supply Recommendations to shift thinking and spur appropriate action to balance the water needs of both farms and aquatic ecosystems.


Recommendations

1. Create a Stronger Knowledge Base

2. Improve Support Mechanisms for Growers

3. Move Toward Outcome- Based Policy and Regulatory Frameworks that Foster Agricultural Water Stewardship

Read entire Report


Agricultural Water Stewardship Definition

The agricultural use of water in a manner that optimizes agricultural water use while addressing the co-benefits of water for food production, the environment, and human health. Agricultural water stewardship is premised on the notion that water management decisions cannot be made in isolation of the ecological, social, and economic context. It emphasizes whole-farm, place-based approaches that recognize the role of agriculture in the local watershed, and of local biogeographical conditions such as soil type, soil ecology, topography, and terrestrial and aquatic ecology in water management decisions.


Sidenote

Nearly a quarter of farmers surveyed by the Agricultural Water Management Council said that lack of technical assistance limited their ability to implement water conservation practices. Magnation offers free information on how the H2O Energizer can be beneficial to your Farm, as well as Home and Garden.

 

New strain referred to as E. coli O-104

Wednesday, June 8th, 2011

Growers in the U.S. should be paying attention to what’s happening in Europe, said Mosbah Kushad, an associate professor in the Crop Sciences Department at the University of Illinois. Laboratory analysis of the bacteria showed that it is a new strain referred to as E. coli O-104, possibly with an acquired ability to infect large numbers of people. The WHO and scientists at the Beijing Genomics Institute have said that the new strain “has never been seen in an outbreak situation before” and that it is “highly infectious and toxic.”

The familiar E. coli O157 H7 was first discovered in California in the mid 1980s when a women ate an insufficiently cooked hamburger from a fast food restaurant. Since then, this bacterium has caused millions of infection and hundreds of fatalities around the world, with billions of dollars in economic losses. If this European variant is new and can cause large numbers of infections, as has been suggested, Kushad says it will have a huge impact on food industries worldwide. E. coli travels very fast in contaminated foods, especially raw foods such as fruits and vegetables, because it can be killed only by heat and chemical treatment. With food commerce being more global than ever before, it is expected that the new strain may reach the U.S. within a few months, he added.

This new discovery highlights the need for everyone in the produce industry to be more vigilant about food safety and good agricultural practices, says Kushad, who advised growers that it is not too late for this season to evaluate their operations and to look at where they can improve food safety. Here are a few areas that may be of concern, according to Kushad.

1. Water and water sources. It is highly recommended that you send samples for analysis at the beginning of the growing season, in the middle, and at the end. Have the samples evaluated for total coliform, fecal coliform, and E. coli. Run the analysis even if you use city water, and remember that you cannot use surface or pond water to wash produce unless it has been properly cleaned and tested. Chlorinate well water if needed, and use the information below in the equipment sanitation section.

2. Worker hygiene. Workers need to be trained on how to follow good agricultural practices. They need to wash their hands with soap (anti-bacterial soap works best; or use unscented soap) and potable water and dry their hands with disposable paper towels. Train workers to lather their hands, their nails, and between their fingers for at least 15 seconds; they must wash their hands every time they leave their work place, even if they did not go the restroom. Also make sure that there is adequate signage in the washing area in the language that the workers can read and understand.

3. Equipment sanitation. Wash equipment at the end of each work day with a chlorine solution or other sanitizers followed by water only to prevent rust formation. To sanitize equipment, you may use hot water first, then wash with a 200 ppm chlorine solution. For fruits and vegetables, use 50 to 100 ppm chlorine solution followed by potable water wash. Make sure to check water pH and water temperature. Chlorine works best at pH lower than 7.4 because chlorine forms mostly hypochlorous acid at low pH and hypochlorite ions at high pH above 7.8. Hypochlorous acid is the more effective sanitizer, whereas the ions are more oxidizers. Also, high organic matter reduces chlorine concentration, so check the level of chlorine every two to four hours, depending on the crop you want to sanitize. Temperature also affects chlorine levels in solution. High temperatures increase chlorine volatility, so your water temperature should be around 50 to 55F for better chlorine effectiveness and for keeping the produce relatively cool.

4. There are many other areas in your operation that may need attention, such as compost, grazing animals, your neighbors’ raw sludge runoff, or other factors that may affect the safety of the produce you grow.

“Remember,” Kushad concludes, “an ounce of prevention is better than a pound of cure.”

For more information on lesser known e. coli types, click here.