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Archive for the ‘Environment’ Category

Moisture retention went up 251% with 50% less water

Thursday, July 14th, 2016

Moisture Retention up 251%

In the Fruitvale School District, located in northwest Bakersfield, California, Brian Prine has been Director of Maintenance, Operations and Transportation, for almost 11 years. Brian oversees the irrigation of six different campuses in this region. When state requirements forced him to cut his watering time from 6 days a week to 3 days a week, the results were soon evident. The turf on some of the grounds and fields turned brown and, in localized areas, disappeared altogether.  One of the campuses, the Discovery Elementary School, was particularly troublesome. The soil there was clay-based and the lack of water was slowly turning the ground to brick.

Before the drought restrictions were imposed, Prine used to water the grounds 6 days a week in the summer. Now, he is limited to 3 days of watering per week.  “I can’t increase my watering,” said Prine. “And because my campus is so big, I need the full watering time allotted to me. So I had to find a solution that could keep the soil and turf healthy, using half as much water.” However, after doing some research, Prine was hard-pressed to find a solution that was within his budget. “I could use a ‘liquid gypsum’ product on the grounds that has been known to work. But the cost was beyond what my budget allowed. The cost of one year’s worth of applications would be $7,860, and that’s not even considering the added expenses of of time and labor needed to apply the wetting agent about every other month.”

Prine also heard about a water treatment product from a company called Magnation Water Technologies, which claimed to save water, support healthy soil and grass and eliminate the need for wetting agents. Figuring that it was worth a try, he put Magnation to the test on his most problematic campus. He found that the Magnation system could easily be integrated with his existing irrigation set-up at the Discovery School. The company claimed that the product can last for as long as 15 years without needing replacement. The cost?  $3400.  Compared to the $7860 for one application of a wetting solution that would only cover one year, it was well worth the trial, according to Prine.

Read the article here

Road Trip around The Netherlands, Land of Water Technologies

Thursday, November 5th, 2015

It is a known fact that The Netherlands has a long and successful history of implementing forward-thinking water technologies. It was out of necessity—growing food and supporting life—that more land was created by moving the ocean over a bit to accommodate this quest for survival and thriving. This visionary clan of water engineers and scientists seem to have contributed to a ubiquitous presence around the planet. It may be of no coincidence that many of the distributors around the world that have aligned with Magnation Water Technologies are also Dutch.

Magnation’s CEO, Mike Jenzeh, happens to be en route to Hannover, Germany this week to exhibit the world’s largest agricultural machinery and equipment show: Agritechnica. While spending a few days in the motherland of water technologies with our European distributor, Piet Regnerus of Magliv Corporation, Mike and Piet had the fantastic opportunity to visit with several early adopter customers of Magnation’s water-intelligent technologies.

Check out some of these great images of professional soccer clubs using Magnation’s systems—PSV Eindhoven and and SC Heerenveen. The Philips Stadion is a soccer stadium in Eindhoven, the Netherlands, and is the home of PSV (Philips Sport Vereniging). With a capacity of 35,000, it is the third-largest football stadium in the country.

PSV_Magnation_FB

 

Also the soccer club SC Heerenveen in Friesland demonstrates its leadership in adopting Magnation’s turf-boosting clean and green technology for superior turf.

SC-Heerenveen_FB
In addition to supporting the health and vitality of sports turf in The Netherlands, Magnation systems can also be found keeping golf courses green and thriving. One extremely visible example of Magnation at work can be found at the highly reputable and elite Golf club, The International, near Amsterdam’s Schiphol Airport. The renowned course has been using Magnation systems for the past year with excellent results and data to prove it.

The-International_Magnation_FB2

 

According to Ron le Boulanger, who in collaboration with head greens-keeper Nico Burns, has conducted the data testing of the turf at The International course,  “When I was first told about magnetized spraying fluid for better leaf coverage and faster absorption, I didn’t believe it. But after testing it, it was all clear to me. Magnation’s Drift Control really works fabulously! The boom side with treated spraying fluid had a 10-15cm wider spraying pattern than the control side of the boom. Also, absorption was visibly faster with Drift Control. Drift Control can save us pesticide costs and lower the environmental damage.”

This visual comparison of their golf course says it all:

The-International_Magnation_irrigation_water_saving_golf_course_FB

Magnation is currently in the process of helping The International get “Geo certification”—An an eco type of certification in The Netherlands for reducing Co2 omissions and toxic inputs such as fungicides.

Seasun_Magnation_FB

Moving over into the agriculture realm, Mike and Piet met with Wim Gresnigt, managing director of Seasun, a leading greenhouse producer of tomatoes and paprika. Seasun, located in Kapelle in Zeeland, in the southwest domain of The Netherlands, has a greenhouse facility of over 50 hectares. After testing Magnation’s water system using a tds and ec meter, results were as follows:

TDS 2.24 treated with Magnation 2.37
EC 5.24 treated with Magnation 5.37

According to Wim, Magnation reduces the amount of fertilizer needed.

 

More updates to come… stay tuned! Read more about our technology here.

 

 

Keeping School Grounds and Sports Fields Alive During Times of Drought

Wednesday, October 21st, 2015

Landscape Managers Find a Cost-Effective Way of Treating Water and Saving Recreational Areas

Boy on Field_lo rez

It’s widely known that the serious drought conditions in California and other western states have taken a critical toll on the agriculture industry. But did you know that many K-12 schools and universities throughout these regions have had to drastically curtail – and in some cases, eliminate — their outdoor sports activities due to the sustained lack of rainfall? In Santa Cruz, California, restrictions were imposed on all residents and businesses starting in 2014, in order to cut overall usage by 25% (in June of the same year it became a statewide mandate). Businesses and organizations with large landscaped sites, including schools and city parks using outdoor irrigation systems, were required to limit themselves to one-third of the water that was needed to maintain their gardens, lawns or fields. As a result, fields were closed at UC Santa Cruz as well as local high schools. Athletic programs were put on hold. This may sound like an extreme scenario, but it is far from being an isolated case. Throughout California and other drought-ravaged states, the dwindling supplies of water for landscape purposes is responsible for the closure of parks, golf courses, playgrounds and sports fields.

Aesthetics aren’t the only thing at risk when restrictions are imposed on landscaped grounds. When outdoor school and recreational areas are not adequately watered, the ground becomes rock hard and for those playing soccer or football, or even children playing at recess outside of their elementary schools, the results of falling on such hard ground can be injurious. For this reason, parks, recreation and grounds superintendents and maintenance managers are clamoring for solutions that will allow them to make their limited irrigation water go further. The following report highlights one such solution that is not only rescuing landscaped areas, but is also saving groundskeepers a substantial amount of money by eliminating the cost and labor of using wetting agents.

The Discovery School, Bakersfield, CA

In the Fruitvale School District, located in northwest Bakersfield, California, Brian Prine has been Director of Maintenance, Operations and Transportation, for almost 11 years. Brian oversees the irrigation of six different campuses in this region. When state requirements forced him to cut his watering time from 6 days a week to 3 days a week, the results were soon evident. The turf on some of the grounds and fields turned brown and, in localized areas, disappeared altogether. One of the campuses, the Discovery Elementary School, was particularly troublesome. The soil there was clay-based and the lack of water was slowly turning the ground to brick.

Before the drought restrictions were imposed, Prine used to water the grounds 6 days a week in the summer. Now, he is limited to 3 days of watering per week. “I can’t increase my watering,” said Prine. “And because my campus is so big, I need the full watering time allotted to me. So I had to find a solution that could keep the soil and turf healthy, using half as much water.” However, after doing some research, Prine was hard-pressed to find a solution that was within his budget. “I could use a ‘liquid gypsum’ product on the grounds that has been known to work. But the cost was beyond what my budget allowed. The cost of one year’s worth of applications would be $7,860, and that’s not even considering the added expenses of of time and labor needed to apply the wetting agent about every other month.” Prine also heard about a water treatment product from a company called Magnation Water Technologies, which claimed to save water, support healthy soil and grass and eliminate the need for wetting agents. Figuring that it was worth a try, he put Magnation to the test on his most problematic campus. He found that the Magnation system could easily be integrated with his existing irrigation set-up at the Discovery School. The company claimed that the product can last for as long as 15 years without needing replacement. The cost? $3400. Compared to the $7860 for one application of a wetting solution that would only cover one year, it was well worth the trial, according to Prine.

The rewards of trying something new

It’s now autumn in Bakersfield, CA. And just in time for the return of students to the Discovery School, the grounds are today healthy and looking good. To ascertain just how well this new irrigation treatment is working, Prine and his crew take monthly samples from different outdoor locations around the school. After only using Magnation for several months, the results of the tests are impressive (see charts below). The sod roots in September were more than twice as long as they were in July, and the average ground moisture extended almost three times deeper from July to September. According to Prine, “It’s clear to me that this product is doing what I was told it was going to. We have restored our soil and turf back to a healthy condition using half as much water, with the Magnation product. And it’s much more time- and cost-effective than using any type of wetting agent to try to get similar results. The product is already paying for itself after only several months.”

Turf and Soil Tests Done at Discovery School, Fruitvale School District

Screen Shot 2015-10-21 at 10.23.58 AMScreen Shot 2015-10-21 at 10.24.04 AM

 

Dick’s Sporting Goods Park, Commerce City, CO

To verify the results that Prine experienced at the Discovery School, we traveled to a completely different location to investigate another recent customer of this seemingly incredible water treatment system. Commerce City, Colorado is home to Dick’s Sporting Goods Park, also known as DSG Park, a soccer-specific stadium that hosts the Colorado Rapids professional soccer team. In addition to the stadium, DSG Park offers 25 soccer fields; 23 of them use natural grass that must be consistently maintained and kept healthy. Phil McQuade, the current Director of Turf at DSG Park and Stadium, has been employed by the complex since it opened in 2007, and was looking for a solution to help maintain healthy coverage on these fields.

“We’re located in a particularly high-wind area and because of this we often experience dry spots in the turf. Since people who use these fields expect the grounds to be in top shape, we needed to find a sustainable solution to this problem.” McQuade discovered the Magnation products at a local trade show and decided to experiment. “Surrounding the stadium, we have four pods with six fields in each pod. These fields are regularly used for soccer, lacrosse, football, you name it. We decided to test out the product by installing a Magnation unit in the irrigation system to just one of our pods. That was in April of this year, and now we (myself, my assistant and our irrigation consultant) are definitely seeing a reduction of dry spots. Not only have the areas of dryness shrunk, but the turf is now coming in thicker.”

Convinced by the tangible results they got on these six fields, McQuade just purchased an additional unit to install for another pod of fields. “We think there is a definite benefit to using this water treatment,” said McQuade. “We’re also testing an area inside the large stadium; a couple of berms that are south-facing and right by a building. They are constantly being baked by sunlight all day. So we wanted to see what would happen if we put Magnation on the irrigation heads in that section.” McQuade and his colleagues installed Magnation on one side of this problematic section, but not on the other, and again found evidence of how well this treatment worked. McQuade sums it up by saying, “Everything being equal on both sides, the one side treated with Magnation appeared to have less dry patches and the turf was denser. I honestly believe that the Magnation treatment helps water penetrate the soil and therefore we’re getting deeper roots and healthier turf.”

Challenging the status quo

With such compelling testimonies from the users of this unique water treatment system, one can’t help but be curious why – especially during these times of severe drought conditions – Magnation has not yet gained a higher level of ubiquity. According to Mike Jenzeh, the co-founder and CEO of the Oakland, CA-based company, “Change happens gradually, especially with products that are disrupting the status quo of the way things have been done for decades. But, when you have something that is proven to work again and again in a variety of applications; when the evidence collected from hands-on experience by agricultural experts, landscape managers, golf superintendents and the like, becomes undeniable, then people are more willing to give it a try. We’re not quite at the tipping point yet, but word is spreading fast and more and more people are turning to us. We have demonstrated that we can help a wide range of water issues, and the proof is in the results.”

Although this “different” way of addressing landscape and agricultural irrigation problems is finally gaining recognition, Magnation is a David among many Goliaths in the water treatment industry. However, if you recall the outcome of that ancient confrontation, it’s not too much of a stretch to imagine that, with such a demonstrable method of tackling BIG irrigation problems during desperate times, Magnation has just the right slingshot for saving water and helping to save our gardens, parks and recreation areas.

Water Productivity and How Physics (chemical-free) Improves Water Quality and Conservation

Thursday, August 27th, 2015
The new Fall issue of Turf Trends Magazine published an important article on water productivity on page 104; and how physics (zero chemicals) can play a major role in water quality/conservation and penetration. Enjoy!

http://read.uberflip.com/i/560552-turf-trends-fall-2015

TurfTrends Fall 2015 Article on Magnation

Golf Course Superintendent Saves 2.5 Million Gallons Per Month with Magnation

Monday, April 13th, 2015
My name is Dean Piller, Member of the GCSAA for 25 years.  I am the Superintendent of the Cordova Bay Golf Course in Victoria, British Columbia and Past Past President of the Canadian Golf Superintendents Association.  I read with interest an article about the water restrictions and serious drought facing California.  Two years ago I began doing research on the Magnation product line that has the ability to reduce irrigation requirements for turf and agriculture crops by up to 25%.  We have installed pump station magnets on both of my golf courses with noticeable results.  Last summer, in one of the hottest and driest summers on record our irrigation daily run times were 80,000 gallons less per night equating to 2.5 million gallons per month.  
Sincerely,
Dean Piller
Superintendent
Magnation-Water-Savings-Cordova-Bay-Golf-Course-Testimonial_web

Use less energy in 2015, and save more water.

Thursday, January 1st, 2015

Using Less Energy
First of all, Happy New Year!
May it be the BEST one yet!!

It’s the little things. Add them up and it turns out to be a great thing. Making personal bests, for example. As personal resolve, I (one of the founders of Magnation) am committed to reducing my impact by both practicing myself and teaching my kids to turn off the lights when we/they leave the room—all the time. I grew up in a household where all the lights in the house on was normal. It meant comfort. However, times, as well as myself, have changed! I am still comfortable with less lights on (except the lights on the Christmas tree 🙂 )—and feeling satisfied knowing my impact is about doing my part in the community.

Using less energy means also using less water.

In drought-stricken California, where I was born and currently live, irrigation water critical to about 3 million acres of agricultural land in the San Joaquin and Sacramento valleys and along California’s central coast, but that quantity was significantly reduced in WY (Water Year) 2014. The CVP (Central Valley Project) also provides urban water for millions of people and industrial water essential to the San Francisco Bay Area’s economy. Water from the CVP is also crucial for the environment, wildlife and fishery restoration, and hydroelectric power production.

So, for those of us who read parts of articles due to time constraints, this is what local water impacts:

  • Agriculture
  • Industrial use
  • Household use
  • Environment
  • Wildlife & fishery restoration (life’s balance, and food)
  • Energy

During Water Year 2014, CVP powerplants generated about 2.7 billion kilowatt-hours. Project use consumed about 25 percent of this energy; the remaining energy was made available for marketing. That’s for us folks to use.

How does Magnation help reduce energy consumption?

Magnation significantly helps reduce friction, making it easier to pump and move water with less energy. Simply put, magnetic field softens the water, making it easier to flow.

In Agriculture, customers have reported using 10% less energy using Magnation’s RainBolt™ for well casings, for example. Apply the same calculation to households who use the Bolt H2O Softener™ improving the same energy consumption  (not to mention environmental & cost benefits of less chemicals/detergents in the house and removal of salt-softeners).

And there are plenty more ways to do our little parts. For now, it’s about turning that switch off for me, when it’s time. Thanks for reading!

From our family to yours, we wish you all the best for a healthy, good and properous 2015!

~ Stef

Learn more 

 

 

 

 

Magnation can SAVE 60.5 BILLION GALLONS OF WATER A DAY

Thursday, October 23rd, 2014

How much water is used in the United States each day for irrigation of crops?

Daily irrigation use is much larger than drinking water use (about four times), but the volume depends on the location and the time of year. It takes about 50 glasses of water just to grow enough oranges to produce one glass of orange juice, for example. One estimate puts the total amount used for irrigation at 141 billion gallons a day, 66% from surface water and 34% from groundwater. Of course, most irrigation water is not treated as tap water is. A 20% reduction equals a savings of an average of 28.2 billion gallons daily in US agricultural land alone! 

Total industrial use, by comparison, is about 160 billion gallons per day. A 20% reduction equals a savings of 32 billion gallons in US industrial applications, daily.

Information provided by Agricultural Water Conservation Clearinghouse

An independent controlled study conducted in 2014 by Olds College in Canada; (The Effects of Magnet Treated Irrigation Water on Kentucky Bluegrass in a Greenhouse Environment, MacKenzie, Johb, Plantje, 2014) treated irrigation water with Magnation® Rainbolt™ water systems in a greenhouse environment, with the control group remaining untreated. Results show the same effect is achieved while using 20% less irrigation water when treated, for a total of 80% water application, as compared to the controlled amount of 100% normal water application. 

Approximately 2.08 billion gallons of water are used everyday to irrigate golf courses in the United States. (Lyman, 2012). A 20% reduction equals a significant savings of 416 million gallons daily in US turfgrass for golf courses alone.


In summary, in only Agricultural, Industrial and Golf turgrass applications, Magnation Water Technologies can SAVE 60.5 BILLION GALLONS OF WATER A DAY without any added chemicals, energy, or maintenance to make it work, and zero by-products.

Better Water for Feeding 9 Billion

Wednesday, October 22nd, 2014

According to National Geographic, Farming is the thirstiest user of our precious water supplies and a major polluter, as runoff from fertilizers and manure disrupts fragile lakes, rivers, and coastal ecosystems across the globe. We’ll likely have two billion more mouths to feed by mid-century—more than nine billion people. But sheer population growth isn’t the only reason we’ll need more food. The spread of prosperity across the world, especially in China and India, is driving an increased demand for meat, eggs, and dairy, boosting pressure to grow more corn and soybeans to feed more cattle, pigs, and chickens. If these trends continue, the double whammy of population growth and richer diets will require us to roughly double the amount of crops we grow by 2050. 5 suggestions from the writers of “Feeding The World” article:

  1. Step One: Freeze Agriculture’s Footprint
  2. Step Two: Grow More on Farms We’ve Got
  3. Step Three: Use Resources More Efficiently
  4. Step Four: Shift Diets
  5. Step Five: Reduce Waste

Magnation Water Technologies can help with:

  • Step One: Reducing Agriculture’s Footprint by using less pesticides, fertilizers, herbicides and insecticides, along with 10% less energy to pump water. This means less pollution not only by reducing inputs, but also by softer water entering the soil reducing surface runoff significantly.
  • Step Two: Grow More on Farms ~ with healthier water, improved soil conditions, and more vigorous plants, crop yield not only increases, but crop quality does too. And Livestock benefits include healthier animals with improved hydration and nutrient absorption, and improved disease resistance.
  • Step Three: Use Resources More Efficiently ~ every type of farming operation can benefit from using 20-30% less water, 10% less inputs, 10% less energy to move the water. Not to mention longer-lasting equipment and less maintenance due to less scale buildup. All with no added chemicals, energy, or maintenance.

San Joaquin Valley Farmer

Wednesday, October 15th, 2014

A Southern San Joaquin Valley orchardist was experiencing health issues. One of Magnation’s sales reps invited him to try our chemical-free water treatment unit on his house. If it helped the well water for the home, he might consider larger units for his orchards. Not only did it improve his landscaping and make the use of water in the home more economic, his health problems cleared up as well.

He then ordered an 8” Magnation unit for one of his deep wells.  His farm manager said if he had known about the purchase, he would have discouraged it.

Some months later, the farm manager stated, “I haven’t seen such great results on my trees in 15 years!” He said they used to load up with gypsum and other chemicals to keep things in balance. Magnation’s Rainbolt unit changed all that.

They bought two more 8” units for the other wells. Given the drought and falling water tables, anything that cuts water usage by 20% while saving chemicals, lowers pumping energy load, improves crop output and quality needs to be realized.

More real people just like you have their stories to share.

#Drought, #SaveWater, #Healthier Crops, #HardWater

 

 

Biochemical Sequence of Nutrition in Plants

Monday, August 11th, 2014

Biochemical Sequence of Nutrition in Plants is a great article which bring attention to how agriculture can be oversimplified.  And when it is oversimplified, actions intended to benefit plant growth, like adding NPK fertilizer, can actually hinder the process.   While it can be helpful to simplify complex problems, solutions that only address a portion of the issue or process are not sustainable.  In this article, the author identified at least 8 elements that are important for comprehensive plant health, but many fertilizers only focus on 3: nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium.  The author’s more holistic approach to agriculture is more sustainable and effective in the long run.